Dance & Drum of Nigeria, West Africa & Beyond! 2015

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Come by and celebrate with community the power of preserving indigenous cultures of Africa in America.

https://www.facebook.com/events/626290614165704/

Schedule:

DRUM
Saturday Febrary 7 2:00-3:30 pm

DANCE
Monday February 9 7:00 – 8:30 pm

DANCE
Thursday February 12 7:00 – 8:30 pm

DRUM
Friday 2/13
5:00 – 6:15pm

DANCE
Friday 2/13 6:30 – 8:00 pm

DRUM
Friday 2/13
5:00pm- 6:15pm

Price per class: $15 / Students: $10
Drum rental $5
Group rates available
Trade for work available too

Join Akeem Ayanniyi and Uzo Nwankpa for four unique classes in the art of Nigerian and West African inspired dance, rhythm, culture and tradition. Experience the energy and vitality of African culture through dance and music, shared by two extraodinary artists.

Live drumming, no dance or drum experience necessary, all levels welcome! Ideal for all ages. Wear comfortable clothes, shoes optional.

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/african-dance-drum-workshops-tickets-15388443248

Akeem Ayanniyi leads Agalu. The “Ayan” prefix of Akeem’s name Ayanniyi, indicates that he descends from a family lineage that can be traced back 700 years to the Yoruba deity ofdrumming, Ayan Agalu. As the ninth generation of his family to play the traditional Yoruba talking drum, Akeem, is from the Western Nigerian town of Erin Oshun near the historic art center of Oshogbo.He has been performing since the age of five and has, as a performer and teacher, toured much of Africa as well as Germany, Brazil, Sweden and the United States. Akeem settled in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1993 and founded Agalu in 1998. http://www.agalu.com

Uzoamaka (Uzo) Nwankpa is from the eastern part ofNigeria, formerly known as Biafra. She migrated to the United States and has continued to promote health and wellness through movement. She developed a program called the Uzo method project which facilitates healing through the indigenous sounds and movements of her country. She is a descendant of an all time award winner of the Atilogwu dance (specific to Iwollo town) competition of the Eastern Region of Nigeria Mazi Emmanuel Nwankpa. http://www.theuzo.com

Nigerian Drum and Dance Workshop in AZ

 

Nigerian Drum and Dance Tucson AZ Jan 2014

Photo by Jade Beall

Monday 1/27/14
Song and Dance 7pm

Tuesday 1/28/13
Flagstaff Arts & Leadership Academy
3401 N. Fort Valley Rd. Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Dance @7pm

Thursday 1/30/14
Dance @ 7pm

Friday 1/31/14
Drum @ 5pm
Dance @ 6:30pm

Sat 2/1/14
Drum @ 6:30pm

$15/class
$10 student discount

No drum and dance experience necessary.

Drum Class:
Akeem Ayanniyi is the ninth generation of his family to play the traditional Yoruba talking drum. He is from Erin Oshun near the historic art center of Oshogbo in Nigeria. He has been performing since the age of five and has toured much of Africa as well as Germany, Brazil, Sweden and the United States as a performer and teacher.

www.agalu.com

Dance Class:
Uzo Nwankpa is from Enugu in Southeast Nigeria, She is an Igbo woman educating communities on the history of the country, how Igbo style dance “Egwu Igbo” continues to evolve across the continents and the various techniques of Igbo style dance. Uzo emphasizes the importance of healing through music and movement and uses this medium to facilitate her dance classes

Hope to see you all there

Uzo

Recovering Home

Recovering Home explores the unique subjectivities of identity from different ethnic and racial backgrounds, whose paths have woven together on a journey to find home. Coming from the far reaches of the globalized experience, this piece explores a convergence of quests for connection, a sense of belonging and a space to integrate our stories past and present.

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My contribution to the production Recovering home. I hope you can make it out to see the show is San Fransisco

Title: Onye K’ibu?

Onye k’ibu means “Who are you?” A work in progress explores the struggles a first generation immigrant faces with gender, culture, race, and religion. The process of becoming informed and the enlightenment through acculturation. This piece also explores indoctrinated moral codes in culture, choice of freedom, creating new culture and finding a place of healing.